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SOP Manual for Meat Processed from Carcasses

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This industry establishments are primarily engaged in processing or preserving meat and meat by-products (except poultry and small game) from purchased meats. This industry includes establishments primarily engaged in assembly cutting and packing of meats (i.e., boxed meats) from purchased meats.

Market insights:

Over the past 3 years, the Meat Processed from Carcasses industry in India has averaged annual growth of 1.1% to reach $52.6 billion in revenue. The 2020 Meat Processed from Carcasses Market Research Report is an in-depth overview of the Indian industry. The report contains over 100 industry data sets and forecasts covering 2011-2024.

This Indian industry includes companies primarily engaged in processing or preserving meat and meat by-products (except poultry and small game) from purchased meats. This industry includes companies primarily engaged in assembly cutting and packing of meats (i.e., boxed meats) from purchased meats.  The industry includes 1,183 companies with 1,335 facilities.

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2. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Finance Department
3. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Customer Service
4. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for CRM Department
5. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Credit Department
6. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Treasury Department
7. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Human Resources (HR) Department
8. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Training Department
9. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Learning & Development Department
10. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Administration Department
11. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Front Office
12. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for House Keeping
13. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Safety Department
14. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Security Department
15. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Facilities Management Department
16. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Vigilance Department
17. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Legal Department
18. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Information Technology (IT) Department
19. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Sales & Marketing Department
20. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Design & Engineering 
21. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Procurement Department
22. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Production
23. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for SRM Department
24. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Supply Chain Department
25. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Warehouse
26. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for New Product Development Department
27. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Research and Development  
28. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Quality Department
29. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Calibration Department
30. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual for Maintenance Department

This industry comprises of:

  • Bacon, slab and sliced, made from purchased carcasses
  • Beef stew made from purchased carcasses
  • Beef, primal and sub-primal cuts, made from purchased carcasses
  • Bologna made from purchased carcasses
  • Boxed beef made from purchased carcasses
  • Boxed meat produced from purchased carcasses
  • Collagen sausage casings made from purchased hides
  • Cooked meats made from purchased carcasses
  • Corned meats made from purchases carcasses
  • Cured meats (e.g., brined, dried, and salted) made from purchased carcasses
  • Dried meats made from purchased carcasses
  • Frozen meat pies (i.e., tour tires) made from purchased carcasses
  • Hams, canned, made from purchased carcasses
  • Hams, preserved (except poultry), made from purchased carcasses
  • Hot dogs (except poultry) made from purchased carcasses
  • Lamb, primal and sub-primal cuts, made from purchased carcasses
  • Luncheon meat (except poultry) made from purchased carcasses
  • Meat canning (except baby, pet food, poultry), made from purchased carcasses
  • Meat extracts made from purchased carcasses
  • Meat products canning (except baby, pet food, poultry) made from purchased carcasses
  • Meats (except poultry), cured or smoked, made from purchased carcasses
  • Meats, fresh or chilled (except poultry and small game), frozen, made from purchased carcasses
  • Pastrami made from purchased carcasses
  • Pig's feet, cooked and pickled, made from purchased carcasses
  • Pork, primal and sub-primal cuts, made from purchased carcasses
  • Potted meats made from purchased carcasses
  • Processed meats manufacturing
  • Salted meats made from purchased carcasses
  • Sandwich spreads, meat, made from purchased carcasses
  • Sausage and similar cased products made from purchased carcasses
  • Sausage casings, collagen, made from purchased hides
  • Smoked meats made from purchased carcasses
  • Variety meats, edible organs, made from purchased meats
  • Veal, primal and sub-primal cuts, made from purchased carcasses

Meat consumption in developing countries has been continuously increasing from a modest average annual per capita consumption of 10kg in the 1960s to 26 kg in 2000 and will reach 37 kg around the year 2030 according to FAO projections. This forecast suggests that in a few decades, developing countries’ consumption of meat will move towards that of developed countries where meat consumption remains stagnant at a high level. The rising demand for meat in developing countries is mainly a consequence of the fast progression of urbanization and the tendency among city dwellers to spend more on food than the lower income earning rural population. Given this fact, it is interesting that urban diets are, on average, still lower in calories than diets in rural areas. This can be explained by the eating habits urban consumers adopt. If it is affordable to them, urban dwellers will spend more on the higher cost but lower calorie protein foods of animal origin, such as meat, milk, eggs and fish rather than on staple foods of plant origin. In general, however, as soon as consumers’ incomes allow, there is a general trend towards incorporating more animal protein, in particular meat, in the daily diet. Man’s propensity for meat consumption has biological roots. In ancient times meat was clearly preferred; consequently time and physical efforts were invested to obtain it, basically through hunting. This attitude contributed decisively to physical and mental development of humankind. Despite the growing preference in some circles for meatless diets, the Majority of us will continue eating meat. It is generally accepted that balanced diets of meat and plant food are most effective for human nutrition. Quantitatively and qualitatively, meat and other animal foods are better sources of protein than plant foods (except soy bean products). In meat, The essential amino acids – the organic acids that are integral components of proteins and which cannot be synthesized in the human organism – are made available in well balanced proportions and Concentrations. As well, plant food has no Vitamin B12; thus animal food is indispensable for children to establish B12 deposits. Animal food, in particular meat, is rich in iron, which is of utmost importance to prevent anaemia, especially in children and pregnant women. In terms of global meat production, over the next decade there will be an increase from the current annual production of 267 million tons in 2006 to nearly 320 million tons by 2016. Almost exclusively, developing countries will account for the increase in production of over 50 million tons. This enormous target will be equivalent to the levels of overall meat production in the developing world in the mid-1980s and place an vi Meat Processing Technology immense challenge on the livestock production systems in developing countries. The greater demand for meat output will be met by a further shift away from pastoral systems to intensive livestock production systems. As these systems cannot be expanded indefinitely due to limited feed availability and for environmental reasons, other measures must be taken to meet growing meet demand. The only possible alternatives are making better use of the meat resources available and reducing waste of edible livestock parts to a minimum. This is where meat processing plays a prominent role. It fully utilizes meat resources, including nearly all edible livestock parts for human food consumption. Meat processing, also known as further processing of meat, is the manufacture of meat products from muscle meat, animal fat and certain non-meat additives. Additives are used to enhance product flavour and appearance. They can also be used to increase product volume. For specific meat preparations, animal by-products such as internal organs, skin or blood, are also well suited for meat processing. Meat processing can create different types of product composition that maximizes the use of edible livestock parts and are tasty, attractive and nourishing. The advantage of meat processing is the integration of certain animal tissues (muscle trimmings, bone scraps, skin parts or certain internal organs which are usually not sold in fresh meat marketing) into the food chain as valuable protein-rich ingredients. Animal blood, for instance, is unfortunately often wasted in developing countries largely due to the absence of hygienic collection and processing methods and also because of socio-cultural restrictions that do not allow consumption of products made of blood. While half of the blood volume of a slaughtered animal remains in the carcass tissues and is eaten with the meat and internal organs, the other half recovered from bleeding represents 5-8 present of the protein yield of a slaughter animal. In the future, we cannot afford to waste such large amounts of animal protein. Meat processing offers a Suitable way to integrate whole blood or separated blood fractions (known as blood plasma) into human diets. Thus, there are economic, dietary and sensory aspects that make meat processing one of the most valuable mechanisms for adequately supplying animal protein to human populations, as the following explains:

  • All edible livestock parts that are suitable for processing into meat products are optimally used. In addition to muscle trimmings, connective tissue, organs and blood, this includes casings of animal origin that are used as sausage containers.

Meat Processing Technology vii

  • Lean meat is one of the most valuable but also most costly foods and may not regularly be affordable to certain population segments. The blending of meat with cheaper plant products through manufacturing can create low-cost products that allow more consumers access to animal protein products. In particular, the most needy, children and young women from low-income groups, can benefit from products with reduced but still valuable animal protein content that supply

Essential amino acids and also provide vitamins and minerals, in particular iron.

  • Unlike fresh meat, many processed meat products can be made shelf-stable, which means that they can be kept without refrigeration either as (1) canned heat sterilized products, or (2) fermented and slightly dried products or (3) products where the low level of product moisture and other preserving effects inhibit bacterial growth. Such shelf-stable meat products can conveniently be stored and transported without refrigeration and can serve as the animal protein supply in areas that have no cold chain provision.
  • Meat processing “adds value” to products. Value-added meat products display specific flavour, taste, colour or texture components, which are different from fresh meat. Such treatments do not make products necessarily cheaper; on the contrary in many cases they become even more expensive than lean meat. But they offer diversity to the meat food sector, providing the combined effect of nutritious food and food with excellent taste.

SOP Manual for Meat Processed from Carcasses

Research By : Eshwaran Murugappan

 

Written by SOP Team

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